The Unsettling Performance That Showed the World Through AI’s Eyes | WIRED

As computer vision quietly spreads through our lives and landscapes, it’s entertaining and practical, powerful and flawed, amusing and disturbing. The same goes for AI as a whole. You can’t see it. But it’s everywhere.

“There were no conclusions,” said Henry Dills, a photographer and cellist who watched the performance dressed in a brown sport coat and a white scarf that reached past his waist. “These machines are starting to massively overshadow us. It used to be God. Now it’s machines.”

Source: The Unsettling Performance That Showed the World Through AI’s Eyes | WIRED

The limited value of a computer science education – thoughts from the red planet – thoughts from the red planet

Overall I have mixed feelings about the value of a computer science education, mostly because of the personal benefit I have gotten from mine. For most cases though, I think it is severely overvalued. It’s very strange to observe an industry with major talent shortages, and then to know perfectly good self-taught programmers get prematurely rejected in interviews because they don’t have a computer science background. I hope to see the industry improve in this respect, but in the meantime I’m happy to exploit this imbalance as a competitive advantage.

Source: The limited value of a computer science education – thoughts from the red planet – thoughts from the red planet

Tourists Love to Rub the Bronze Balls of Wall Street’s Charging Bull Statue. Why? | Atlas Obscura

Right, so back to the balls. It’s clear they represent the intersection of two universal and timeless human fascinations: money and genitals. But when did touching them become good luck? Why do Brazilian businessmen rub their briefcases against the giant genitalia? Why do groups gather around the bull’s majestic butt crack for family photos, parents gently pushing their children to climb underneath and hug the balls from below?

Source: Tourists Love to Rub the Bronze Balls of Wall Street’s Charging Bull Statue. Why? | Atlas Obscura

Life is Short

“One heuristic for distinguishing stuff that matters is to ask yourself whether you’ll care about it in the future. Fake stuff that matters usually has a sharp peak of seeming to matter. That’s how it tricks you. The area under the curve is small, but its shape jabs into your consciousness like a pin.”

Source: Life is Short

The Curse Of The Fire Horse: Japan’s Ultimate Form Of Contraception – Tofugu

“People born during the year of the Fire Horse are notorious for being bad luck. People born during a Fire Horse years are said to be irresponsible, rebellious, and overall bad news.

And for some reason, women are said to be especially dangerous Fire Horses. They supposedly sap their family’s finances, neglect their children, and drive their father and husband to an early grave.

This myth is so powerful that it seriously affects how people behave. Men might avoid marrying a Fire Horse, and families avoid giving birth to Fire Horse children.”

Source: The Curse Of The Fire Horse: Japan’s Ultimate Form Of Contraception – Tofugu

A New Year, a New Blog

After many fits and starts (and sitting on this domain name for years), I’m choosing 2016 as The Year Brian Gets Serious About This Blog Thing.

Instead of annoying friends and family on Facebook with my obsessive posts about the robot apocalypse, now they’ll have to come here to examine my neuroses.  Other than journaling about humanity’s impending doom, I intend to write about my school learnin’s, food fixin’s, and life in the Cool Gray City of Love.